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Location: Estomad.org / Work program 

Work program

Estomad work packages:WP 1 - WP 2 - WP 3 - WP 4 - WP 5 - WP 6 - List of deliverables


The project was organized in 7 work packages (WPs), of which results have been measured at four milestones (MS). The work packages and their interrelationships are shown in Fig 1.


Fig. 1: overview of the work packages of the ESTOMAD project



WP 1: Research and Technological Development

The goal of this WP was to collect the necessary information and data to serve the other WPs by performing specification and survey studies. A distinction in surveys was made as follows:

a) A survey study has been performed to chart the required/desired ICT tools which industry would need: (1) to take into account energy efficiency as a design attribute (high level application) in the full product design cycle; (2) to analyse existing products (i.e. machines) to optimize their energy consumption and increase their energy efficiency (low level application).

b) A survey study has been performed to identify typical systems, subsystems or components used in machine design for which energy efficiency is an attribute. E.g. electrical engines, guides, movement convertors (e.g. cams), rotating axis, controllers, storage elements (e.g. electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, etc.).

c) A survey study has been performed on existing modelling paradigms and niche tools with a very high focus towards modelling of energy behaviour within machines, at system level, but also at both subsystem and component level. There is a lot of fragmentation in knowledge between various engineering fields.

Based on these surveys the specifications of the ESTOMAD framework have been detailed.

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WP 2: Energy component/subsystem methodology

The general objective of WP2 was to develop a modelling methodology for individual components and looking at an architecture for inter-component communication to describe subsystems. The idea was to derive energy balances for machinery by decomposition of the machine in particular elements which have influence on the energetic state of the machine. To do so on a system/subsystem/component level, the interaction between electrical, mechanical and other types of elements with respect to energy flow has been analysed and a methodology has been developed to be able to do so.

Based on the survey studies performed in WP1, especially b) and c), methodology development was performed on two scales:

(1) on component level
(2) on subsystem level (i.e. assembly of components).

Development on component level focused on the understanding of the behaviour of single components. Not only the, most often obvious or well known, primary functional behaviour needed to be described in mathematical formulations. The focus of WP2 was on developing formulations which cover the description of power and energy quantities of individual components: i.e. ways how components generate energy, dissipate energy, store energy or exchange energy with other components. The latter is related to methodology development on the second scale, the subsystem level method development.

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WP 3: Energy design and system methodology

The general objective of WP3 was to develop an energy design and system methodology. The methodologies developed in WP2 can only be used if good component/subsystem models are available and if new information that is gathered during testing can be compared to simulation results, or even integrated in the simulation models to improve accuracy. It is unrealistic that a very wide variety of subsystem models is made by machine builders, as they acquire many subsystems from suppliers. A more reasonable approach is therefore to involve subsystem manufactures in the modelling and designing process and acquire models through suppliers. However, for such approach to work, all involved parties (1) have to be willing to cooperate and (2) methodologies and tools have to be adopted to support such integrated design approach.

Therefore, this WP developed an abstract framework for energy evaluation and design for energy-efficiency analysis of machine designs taking into account the interaction between machine designers and their suppliers. This framework makes use of the component/subsystem modelling methodology developed in WP2. Different energy processes were defined for the various assembled systems. Specific methodologies for energy optimization and efficient use of resources were developed, thus defining a simulation framework that can be flexibly extended to integrate more aspects provided by different suppliers in a fully automated way.

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WP 4: Implementation of ESTOMAD framework

The general objective of WP4 was the embedding of the developments of WP2 and WP3 on the CAE tool AMESim. In order to be able to use an ICT software tool in an industrial analysis or design cycle, it had to be embedded in an industrially applicable framework, which allowed sufficient flexibility, but also ensured robust usage. WP4 focused on the enhancement of the existing AMESim software tool with the energy modelling and interfacing methodologies developed in WP2 and WP3. Note that, although the methods have been implemented onto the existing AMESim platform, they are more generally applicable also for usage with other platforms.

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WP 5: Validation of methodologies/software tools

The general objective of WP5 was to validate the methodologies and software tools which were developed in WP2, WP3 and WP4 on industrial use cases. After implementation of the verified methodologies onto an industrially available platform, WP5 validated the methodologies on a number of real industrial test cases provided by the industrial partners.

JOBS worked on the energy consumption modelling of their LinX and Jomach 146 milling centres.


Fig. 2: LinX milling centre


PICANOL worked on the energy consumption modelling of a weaving loom (see Fig. 3).


Fig. 3: PICANOL Weaving machines


FIDIA is also a machine tool manufacturer, but focused its participation to the project mainly as component/subsystem supplier of Numerical Control, Motors and Drives.

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WP 6: Dissemination and exploitation

The general objective of WP6 was the overall project management and to ensure the dissemination of ESTOMAD results within the consortium and towards the wider EU community. The project benchmarks were used to organize industrial workshops on both analysis methodologies and component modelling.

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List of deliverables

Nr. Deliverable name
WP
Dissemination level
Delivery date (project month)
D1.1 Desired energy tool survey study
WP1
CO
6
D1.2 Machine components survey study
WP1
CO
3
D1.3 Energy tools survey study
WP1
CO
3
D1.4 ESTOMAD framework specifications
WP1
CO
6
D1.5 Benchmarks
WP1
PU
6
D2.1 Methodology for individual components
WP2
PU
15
D2.2 Architecture to component communication/subsystem modelling
WP2
CO
15
D2.3 Verification on component/subsystem benchmarks
WP2
CO
27
D3.1 Scenario/framework development
WP3
CO
32
D3.2 Verification on system benchmarks
WP3
CO
30
D3.3 "Design for energy efficiency" approach
WP3
PU
32
D4.1 Methodology implementation
WP4
CO
26
D4.2 User interfaces and reporting functionalities
WP4
CO
27
D4.3 Verification of ESTOMAD framework on benchmarks
WP4
PU
27
D4.4 Internal AMESim training 1
WP4
CO
9
D4.5 Internal AMESim training 2
WP4
CO
24
D5.1 Definition of industrial use cases
WP5
CO
12
D5.2 Measurement of critical components
WP5
CO
27
D5.3 Machine tool application
WP5
CO
32
D5.4 Weaving machine application
WP5
CO
32
D5.5 Verification on industrial cases
WP5
PU
32
D6.1 Website
WP6
PU/CO
3
D6.2 Publications
WP6
PU
32
D6.3 Public workshop
WP6
PU
32
D6.4 Future use of foreground
WP6
CO
32


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